EXPLORING WHITENESS WORKSHOP SERIES

The Racial Justice Committee will host two additional sessions on Thursdays in February (22 and 29) to explore and discuss white identity, privilege, fragility, and supremacy. Each session will begin at 7:00 pm in the Church Lounge and conclude at 8:30 pm. Participants need not attend on both dates. Please see the flyer for detailed…

RACIAL JUSTICE PILGRIMAGE PRESENTATION

Travelers to Montgomery, Selma, and Birmingham will show photos, share stories, and invite conversation about how we might build on their pilgrimage experiences to do the work of justice in the Chicago area and beyond. Join pilgrimage participants in the Wallace Moore Fellowship Center on Sunday, February 11 at 11:00 am for a presentation and…

Our Call to Racial Justice: Environmental Justice

The U.S. EPA defines Environmental Justice as “the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income, with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies.” Communities of color disproportionately experience high pollutant and water contamination levels due to close proximity to hazards (Environmental Justice…

Our Call to Racial Justice: Diversity and Inclusion

Do you know the difference between diversity and inclusion? Having one doesn’t necessarily mean that you have the other. Diversity is the presence of differences, while inclusion is the practice of ensuring that people feel welcome, respected, supported, and valued. This effort shouldn’t be limited to workplaces, it should stand wherever and whenever we gather…

Racial Justice Outreach: Understanding Mass Incarceration

Mass incarceration creates a social justice problem, a racial justice problem, a community problem, and an economic problem. First Pres Wilmette’s Racial Justice Committee invites you to learn more about mass incarceration and how you can get involved in criminal justice reform. To get involved in our church’s work, reach out to the church office…

Racial Justice Pilgrimage

In November, FPCW will be sponsoring a racial justice pilgrimage to a number of important historic civil rights sites in Birmingham, Selma, and Montgomery, Alabama. While specific plans for the pilgrimage are still in the development stage, the itinerary will most likely include the Edmund Pettis Bridge in Selma; the Legacy Museum, the National Memorial…

Shorefront Legacy Center – Redlining

REDLINING The term “redlining” has come to mean racial discrimination of any kind in housing, but it comes from government maps first created in the 1930’s that outlined areas where Black residents lived and which were, therefore, deemed risky investments. As early as 1924, North Shore realtors were discouraged from “introducing members of any race…

Shorefront Legacy Center Exhibit – Ebenezer A.M.E. Church

Shorefront Legacy Center Exhibit On October 30, 1882, Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church was established as Evanston’s first recognized black church. Ebenezer A.M.E. took on issues affecting its community such as “Jim Crow” and segregated housing. During the 1970’s, Ebenezer A.M.E facilitated a black history education program.

Shorefront Legacy Center Exhibit

Shorefront Legacy Center Exhibit The Shorefront Legacy Center exhibit is open in our Chapel until the end of February! If you didn’t get to see it last Sunday – or you want to see it again – stop in any Sunday in February before or after church, with your small group if you meet at…